Learnings

Leanna, Fourth Year Medical Student

In the past several weeks I’ve matched to USC’s internal medicine program, graduated medical school, and now am preparing for residency (i.e. filled out 100+ pages of paperwork and bought Pocket Medicine and new shoes). The things I learned about medicine, becoming a doctor, myself, and life during these last four years of medical school are far too many to confine to a blog post, but I’ll note some of the more entertaining and blog-able ones here.

MSI: First year – year of the basic sciences:

I learned that my new best friends would likely be the ones who made art projects with me, art projects with the titles of “Cell Lineage Cupcakes” and “Sandcastle Nephron: a beach study in the functional unit of the kidney”.

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I learned that in order to get decent grades in medical school you had to make huge sacrifices in all other realms of life, sacrifices that I did not have to make in undergrad and at first had a hard time making during this transition.

I learned that from the moment you tell someone, I’m studying to be a doctor, inevitably one of the next questions would be – Oh good, can you check this out for me and tell me if it’s anything serious? Or, sometimes his or her next odd question was, You mean, like a nurse?

Conclusion: I had no life, and far fewer friends than I was used to, but I was okay with it.

MSII: Second year – year of pathology/pathophysiology

I learned all the different ways a person can die (there are a lot).

I learned that pathophysiology is best studied as a group, with cookies.

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I learned that when a professor says, “This concept will be on Step 1”, the entire class wakes up and poises ready with their pencils/iPad note-taking software.

I learned that I could walk around the Drayson Center track for up to three hours at a time while listening to audio lectures.

I learned that while listening to audio lectures at Drayson Center track I ran the risk of getting hit in the head by a stray soccer ball [I learned this lesson twice].

I learned that some of the Step 1 study books had the stupidest study tips, such as, “Just remember the simple acronym AINBIBYXDYAHTGUVI for all the causes of liver failure and you’ll never forget ‘em!”

I learned that the best friends I made in first year were indeed still my best friends and fellow soldiers in the war against overwhelming exams and boards.

MSIII: Third year – year of clinical rotations and the beginning of the hospital hierarchy

I learned that all residents can be bribed, whether they are conscious of it or not – sometimes with food, sometimes with compliments.

I learned that the diseases that in prior years were confined to pages and chapters were infinitely more fascinating when seen up close in a living, hopefully breathing human being.

I learned to act quickly and seriously with the pregnant woman with a life-threatening lupus flare and for the man with a rupturing abdominal aneurysm, and how to lean towards empathy instead of apathy for the patient complaining of non-descript fatigue.

I learned that I loved internal medicine and family medicine and neurology and wilderness medicine and psychiatry and endocrinology and emergency medicine and cardiology and gynecology and critical care and pediatrics.

I learned that Hour #1 of a hernia repair and abdominal adhesion lysis surgery is fascinating, but Hour #9 is not (note that surgery did not make my aforementioned list of rotations and specialties that I love).

I learned that surgeons, upon finding out that I was moderately intelligent and strongly considering primary care as a career, had no inhibition when it came to constantly telling me that it would be a waste of my mind to go into primary care. And this was discouraging.

I learned that there was no possible way to describe my joy and relief with ending my surgery rotation other than this picture:

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I learned that a benevolent neurologist who lets multiple students practice the opthalmoscopic exam (imagine the Death Star killer beam that destroyed Alderaan in a single blast being emblazoned onto your retinas) on her, is a saint and I hope the Vatican City or the Catholic Church or whatever recognizes her as such eventually.

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I learned that as much as I liked doing rotations at White Memorial Medical Center, doing several months’ of rotations there instead of in Loma Linda distanced me from my fellow classmates and disintegrated what little social life I had.

Without a doubt I learned the most during third year. And as I looked back at the beginning of third year compared to the end of third year, I realized that maybe, just maybe, I was actually getting the hang of this doctor thing.

MSIV: Fourth year – year of marketing yourself to residencies and awkward spare time.

I learned that I would have a very hard time choosing between internal medicine and family medicine.

I learned that I loved diversity, puzzle-solving, variety, primary care, and hospitalist medicine, and because of that finally chose internal medicine as my residency path.

I learned that I would have A LOT of time off. What is time off? What do I do with it? Should I study? Should I sleep? Should I go to a pound and adopt another rabbit? Should I read War and Peace? I’ll bake some cupcakes.

I learned how to better practice grace and patience when a family member or friend tells me that they don’t “believe” in Western medicine and prefer only “natural” routes [Hint: arsenic, cyanide, and a variety of lethal mushroom are all “natural”…this could be a topic for a whole different post].

I learned how to be a wife, and in that taking on my husband’s last name of Wise, being called “Dr. Wise” sets quite a high threshold of excellence to which I will be held. Sometimes I wish his last name was Dumb, so that I could be Dr. Dumb and not too much would be expected of me.

I learned on the residency trail that an emphatic “Nope!” is a perfectly acceptable answer when asked if I have plans for specializing after residency.

I learned that Match Day is like a combination of eHarmony, the football draft, the Harry Potter sorting hat, and that part of the Hunger Games when teenagers are chosen to go fight to the death. The last comparison is the most accurate.

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I learned that I liked sushi.

I learned that graduation and all the festivities involved was going to feel extraordinarily surreal, almost joke-like. I’m – graduating? What?

I learned that graduation would be horribly bittersweet as the incredible people I’ve met over the last four years would be leaving to go their separate ways around the country.

In retrospect, I learned that all our well-meaning deans and administrators were morbidly incorrect when they told us during first year, Before you know it, the next four years will fly by and you’ll be graduating! No no no, the years creeped by like a elderly arthritic sloth pulling a wagon full of turtles. With slugs and snails and all other slow things cheering him on.

I learned of all the beautiful hiking trails in the immediate LA area and experienced many of them for myself, some of which for the first time.

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On May 22rd, 2014, I learned that I had officially completed all the requirements for my M.D., and May 25th, I walked with my best friends to receive my doctorate of medicine.

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I learned that the most fierce and profound last four years of academics have brought me to a point where I am entrusted with the well-being of others.

I learned that as a doctor, I am swearing to be a life-long observer, innovator, and of course, insatiable learner. My future patients are my new teachers, the exams will be based on the degree of my patients’ health and wellness, and the hospital and clinics are my full-time classrooms.

A deep gratitude to Loma Linda University for setting me on this path of learning, and to my God for sustaining me with so many blessings, and His promises for my future.

[For any folks who are interested, I plan to be blogging at wisemd.wordpress.com during residency]

Now We’re Family

Danny, First Year Medical Student

We’ve just completed our first set of tests and let me tell you something – it’s a whole new ballgame. I was reminded of this every step of the way, but truly experiencing test week for the first time is something different and very difficult to describe. It’s quite draining, and it brought on a whole new perspective to the Sabbath, and emphasized the importance to unwind.

That following Sabbath, I visited one of many beaches near Loma Linda (one of the many perks of Southern California that is not available to a Ohioan like Ryan Babienco and I). While at the beach, I was enjoying the company of some friends, when one of them said something that brought a smile to my face.

“You’re a part of the family now.”
“What do you mean,” I replied.
“You now know what it means to be a medical student – you’ve completed a test cycle – now we’re family.”

Last Summer Ever

Janna, Second Year Medical StudentGoodbye summer…  Hello second year!

So, another year has begun. From what I’ve heard, this year will be as tough as a femur, possibly the most sleepless year of our med school lives. We’ll have many things to look forward to, such as OSCEs, labs, clinics, exam weeks, and the ominous step one.

We’re supposedly renewed and rejuvenated from the nine weeks of summer. I’m not sure how much rest I’ve stockpiled, but my summer was certainly packed with fun activities. Outside of the eight to nine hours a day of researching, I started wedding planning, finally said “yes!” to the dress, acted as a skit character in VBS, went back to my childhood and watched Disney’s Suite Life of Zack and Cody, listened to Adventures in Odyssey, grilled corn over a campfire, ran a half marathon, and completed an Olympic triathlon with my med school buddies. Click here to see the highlights of our triathlon.

My body was pushed to its limits, and now my brain will get a turn.

Goodbye summer.  Hello second year!

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Lessons Learned Abroad

Paige, Second Year Medical StudentThe summer between the first and second years of medical school is really and truly the last summer break of our lives.  We have 2 months to soak up all the sun and fun we can before we begin the arduous process of tackling second year and USMLE Step 1, which is then followed promptly by beginning our clinical rotations of third year.  Medical students choose to spend this last glorious summer break in a variety of ways; those interested in competitive residency programs pursue summer research programs, others choose to take the summer to travel and spend time with family before allowing medical school to once again take over every aspect of their lives, and others choose to spend time as student missionaries in one of the many locations that Loma Linda sponsors.

Spending my summer as a student missionary was at the top of my list of things to do this summer and has been for quite some time.  I had never been on a mission trip before because I had been waiting until this summer between my first and second years of medical with the hope that I would be able to utilize some of the minimal medical knowledge that I have accumulated in the last year to do some tangible good in the community that I would be serving.  This summer I was privileged to have the opportunity to travel to Honduras, Central America to work in the Hospital Adventista Valle de Angeles.  I was able to serve alongside three of my classmates and a pre-medical student from Union College for four weeks in this beautiful country, and the lessons I learned while on this mission trip will undoubtedly shape my personal and professional life for many years to come.  Below is one of the lessons I learned about short-term mission trips.  I hope that by reading this experience you will think about the impact that short-term mission trips have on the lives of those we serve and on our own lives.

I had my first doubts about the benefits of short-term mission trips while I was boarding my plane from Houston to Tegucigalpa.  The vast majority of travelers boarding the plane with us were Americans wearing bright colored matching t-shirts with “Honduras Mission Trip 2013” printed across their backs.  Most people visiting Honduras were not doing so to enjoy the vast natural beauty of its tropical rainforests, or to explore the rich history of the Mayan ruins, or to immerse themselves in the loving and hospitable culture of the Honduran people.  Instead, nearly everyone on that plane was venturing to Honduras with the hope that they would be able to serve the Honduran people in some way, whether that was through building a church or a school or offering medical or teaching services.  Although this is without question a noble motive, it made me wonder if we had pigeonholed this country into being a place that needs “our generosity.”  I refused to believe that I would be serving the people of Honduras more than they would be serving me because I knew that I would likely learn more from this trip than I would ever be able to repay in service to my teachers.  I knew that I would gain many insights during my time in Honduras and I prayed that God would use me in even the smallest of ways to at least make a small impact on the people that I would encounter.

As the trip progressed, I realized how much I was changing as a result of seeing the things that this country had to offer and how little I felt that I was contributing.  Not being able to speak the language meant that I could not communicate well with those around me; this made it difficult for me to feel like I had made any impact on anyone’s life.  That all changed when Miss Marjorie, a retired teacher from the local Adventist school came into our lives.  We had requested the opportunity to go into the local school and teach the children about healthy living; Miss Marjorie was the person who made this request a reality.  One week, Miss Marjorie was presenting a special English Sabbath School lesson about prayer to our group.  She talked about times that prayers had been answered and shared a personal testimony about how a recent prayer of hers had been answered.  To our amazement, she actually told us that we were the answer to her prayer.  Earlier in the year, she had left her position at the school and never had a chance to say goodbye to her students.  Ever since, she had been praying that she would find a way to get back into the school to see her kids and explain to them why she had to leave.  She said that when the hospital had contacted her about 4 students from Loma Linda who only spoke English and who wanted to work with the kids in the school, she knew that God had worked to answer her prayer to get her back into contact with her kids.  Miss Marjorie showed us that God was using us in ways that we couldn’t have even imagined.

I still believe that the vast majority of short-term mission trips benefit those who go on the trips more than those who are being served.  I also believe that this is rightfully so.  It is important for people going on short-term mission trips to realize that they will likely learn more from their experiences and change more as a result than those who they go to serve.  Having an open mind about choosing to learn and grow from these experiences does not imply selfish motives, in fact, I believe that it is selfish to think that we can go on short-term mission trips and always make a life-changing impact on the communities we serve.  That being said, there is no doubt that God can use us to touch the lives of others on short-term mission trips in ways that we cannot foresee and blesses us immensely through the process.

I am so grateful for the experiences that I had while in Honduras, I grew immensely spiritually, emotionally, and professionally, and I am assured that God was able to use us in ways that we may never even know.  I would argue that there is no better way to spend the summer between the first and second years of medical school.

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My Christmas Break

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Snow. Even though it can be found only an hour away, blanketing the mountains that border Loma Linda, I sometimes miss walking outside to find a blanket of fresh white powder. That’s one of my favorite parts about traveling back home for the holidays; frolicking and playing in one of nature’s gifts. Christmas is well over a month behind us, but many states across the eastern US are still seeing plenty of snow. So as I sit here and wonder what it would be like to attend medical school in the midst of a blizzard, let me show you a little bit of how I spent some time playing in snow:

I had made that video for my family so it’s a little bit on the longer side, but I thought it might be fun to share with you as well, just so you know med students still know how to have fun every now and then!

Flash forward to the present and it’s business as usual: memorizing antibiotics, learning the inner workings of the kidneys, and trying to boost my q-bank average. A few days ago, we were given the opportunity to choose the order in which we’d like to rotate through each specialty during our 3rd year of medical school.  It was just another reminder at how fast this year has been been progressing, and how we are merely moments away from working in the hospital. I am beginning to see a light at the end of the tunnel…